German Spitz

German Spitz

German Spitz

German Spitz
Standard: 

Height: 11.5 - 14 inches, Weight: 23 - 41 pounds


Other name: 

Deutscher Spitz, German Wolfspitz, Giant Deutscher Gross Spitz, Standard Deutscher Mittel Spitz, Toy Deutscher Spitz Klein


Family: 

Spitz


Giant: 

Height: 16 - 17 inches, Weight: 38.5 - 40 pounds


Place of Origin: 

Germany


Toy: 

Height: 9 - 11 inches, Weight: 18 - 22 pounds


Average Size of Male and Female: 


Primary Current Function: 

companion


Original Function: 

farm worker, companion


Date of Origin: 

1400s


Overview:  

The ancestors of the German Spitz are likely Nordic herding dogs with heavy coats, such as the Samoyed. History suggests that the German Spitz came to Europe with the Vikings, and literature that references this breed dates back to 1450.

German Spitz Breed Health


Standard: 

13 - 15 years


Toy: 

14 - 15 years


Minor concerns: 

none


Suggested tests: 

none


Giant: 

12 - 13 years


Occasionally seen: 

none


Major concerns: 

none


German Spitz Breed History

This breed comes in three different size varieties: the giant, the standard, and the toy. While the toy and giant varieties were said to have been mostly companions to their owners, research shows that the standard type was more of a working dog, often used on farms. It is said that the toy type was brought to England from Germany (specifically Pomerania) more than 100 years ago, and therefore it became known as a Pomeranian. This toy dog was also said to have been one of Queen Victoria's favorite breeds and sometimes called a Victorian Pom. The Pomeranian is now known as a separate breed from the German Toy Spitz, even though the dogs look very similar. The German Spitz breed is quite a rarity, and it has not maintained their original popularity, even in Germany.

German Spitz Breed Appearance

As discussed, the German Spitz is divided into three types based on size. Many aspects of the three types are similar, but in addition to size, they differ in color as well. The color of the giant Spitz includes black, brown, or white. The standard and the toy sizes have much more varied coat colors. All three sizes of this breed feature triangular and compact ears and large eyes. The body has a thick, long coat, while the hair on the head is comparatively short. The small feet of this breed has hair between the toes, and the tail is curved on top of the back.

German Spitz Breed Temperament

Any type of German Spitz makes a good watchdog. It is an alert breed that is ever watchful over its family and home. It loves attention and will demand to be a part of the action. While it likes to please, it can also be stubborn and willful. This dog is able to jump well and may often stand on its back legs when looking for attention. The German Spitz tends to be suspicious of strangers and may bark a lot at people and other animals. This type of dog is not recommended for homes with young children, as it tends to be nervous and snappish at times. However, the German Spitz would likely do fine in a home with older children, and it is an exceptional choice for a companion for the elderly. Obedience training is necessary, but not easy. The experienced owner will know how to make the dog understand who is boss.

German Spitz Breed Maintenance

Grooming of the German Spitz is quite easy. Regular brushing or combing to prevent matting is really all that is necessary. Be advised that this breed may need to be taught to stay still during grooming time. This breed is ideal for apartment dwelling, as it is quite active when inside and only a small yard is necessary to provide the exercise this dog needs. The German Spitz enjoys going for long walks, but it is just as happy curling up with the family.

German Spitz Ratings & Reviews

My favorite breed - June 14, 2017

Health

Maintenance

Obedience

I'll start off by saying that you need to pick a breed that is right for YOU and YOUR needs, and the German Spitz happens to be that for me. June is a very spunky, lively, affectionate, and adventurous dog--and I love that about her. She is ever loyal to me, and has never snapped at me or even growled. Not even when we were just getting to know each other after adoption. She also comes right when she's called. She is lovely with older people, children and everything in between. BUT THEY ARE HIGH ENEREGY DOGS. June needs discipline and is often mischievous. She has her own ideas and is smart enough to carry them out. Health wise, she is 7 and her only problem is dry skin which was easily treated. The breed also gets knee problems but besides that, they're resilient. June gets groomed once every 4 months and brushed every other day. Don't get a long haired dog if you don't want to deal with it properly. All in all, they are a beautiful, charismatic breed that I'm loyal to.

Rescued a German Spitz, - December 31, 2016

Health

Maintenance

Obedience

I was warned he jumped fences + chased cars, once chased a car 1 km down a beach at 50kms hr, but he came back, VERY affectionate + playful, he sleeps on my bed, + wakes me with kisses, Needs a good walk every day, then happy to sleep at your feet for hours. Was told they have "seperation anxiety", + he cries if I walk 20 feet away. He LOVES children + other dogs, + ignores cats. Perfect companion for a family or older people.

Great dogs - December 23, 2016

Health

Maintenance

Obedience

A German Spitz is not for new or passive dog owners. That being said, they are very bright and affectionate. Barking can be an issue, but if you are consistent and fair they can be taught to be quiet when told to hush. My dog does require my attention and will persist in trying to get it until I play with him for a while. This is no means undesirable as his dancing is so adorable. I have found that he does like to roam when off leash so I have outfitted his collar with a light and tags with my name and phone number. I adopted him as an adult from a shelter and he was not neutered when he was picked up so his roaming might have been something that was learned prior to becoming my dog and I may never actually change that. I have had several dogs, large and small, and find the German Spitz to be delightful and much easier to train than your average terrier. It is a shame that this is a relatively unknown breed as they are very cute and way less neurotic than a Pom or Yorkie.

Wouldn't recommend this breed - December 08, 2016

Health

Maintenance

Obedience

Bolo was a good companion, he was always around me and most of the time he was a lovely dog, however, sometimes he was aggressive and one day he bit me for no reason. My experience with this dog was not positive; I encountered many problems like excessive barking, aggressiveness and several health problems.

Review German Spitz